Working Greyscale Part 1: Colours and Contrasts

Colour is a very effective tool for creating a mood. Bright reds will tell the reader that the book is going to be violent or sexy; deep blues signify something melancholy or profound. Chick-lit covers are invariably bright and cheerful pastels, while crime has a limited palette of strong colours. In The Way of Kings the hero stands before a vast, open canyon stretching into the distance and the majestic colours of the sunset help to evoke the awesome mood of the epic story. In greyscale, the bright and subtle colours become a dappled grey which is neither dramatic nor emotive.

09 The Way of Kings   09wayofkings

In the Timeline cover, the red text of the title contrasts boldly with the dull grey of the knight’s helmet. In greyscale, the red becomes just another shade of grey, lost against the grey helmet.

MichaelCrighton_Timeline   MichaelCrighton

A cover designed to be viewed in greyscale will benefit from contrasts between light and dark, not contrasts between colour. Subtle variations in shade are lost in greyscale. Black and white photographs will work well as greyscale as they are already designed without colour. There is barely any difference between the black and white and greyscale covers of Margaret Thatcher.

13 cover_charles_moore   maggie

The Ming Storytellers works well in both colour and greyscale  because the stylized image has clear lines and obvious contrasts. It doesn’t rely on variations in shade or tone.

TheMingStorytellers   theming2

However, a cover that is simple and bold in greyscale runs the risk of being rather dull when in colour. In my next post I’ll be discussing covers that work well in greyscale and in colour. For other opinions on working in greyscale see Mike Cane.

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One thought on “Working Greyscale Part 1: Colours and Contrasts

  1. Pingback: Better, worse, the same or just different? | Looking at Ebook Covers

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